Take bird photos even bad ones

By , November 17, 2012 1:13 pm

Grebe among the Swans 11/16/12

Grebe among the Swans 11/16/12

When I lived in Memphis and was active in the local birding groups, I tried to take a many pictures as possible when on bird trips without making myself a nuisance and slowing everyone down. If you simply want to identify as many different species of birds, the extra effort to take pictures will slow you down. There is a great benefit in taking photos. We all make mistakes and we all miss birds. Especially with any bird that appears in large group such as water birds, this can allow you to rexamine what you saw and correct your observations or add birds you missed. Yesterday is a good example. We had at least 30 Trumpeter Swans on the lake and I took dozens of photos. One one I saw a Pied-billed Grebe. Hardly a rare bird but any bird is welcome. Today looking at my photos I saw on odd man out (or odd swan out). I had a Tundra Swan in a small group of Trumpeters.

The digital camera has revolutionized wildlife photography. It was simply not possible, in the days of film photography, to examine your images while in the field. Unless one had a mechanized film lab at home, it took quite a while to go from the film canister to either film or contact prints that can be safely examined. Digital photos are almost truly instant. So today barley 45 minutes after taking the photos I am able to see the images on identify them. So below is a image of a Tundra Swan with a Trumpeter. You can see the Tundra is on the right.

Tundra and Trumpeter Swan

Tundra and Trumpeter Swan

One Response to “Take bird photos even bad ones”

  1. Shawnne says:

    It’s amazing the size difference between the two of the swans!!! I love it. Yes, photography is important in birding. I am glad Jerry takes all of the photos. It’s great to see something for sure that you thought you saw.

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